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Cultural Continuity as a Pathway for Métis Peoples Health Promotion: A Descriptive Phenomenological Approach

Date

2024-02-09

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

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Type

Thesis

Degree Level

Masters

Abstract

The Métis Peoples, a distinct group of Indigenous Peoples in Canada, have historically faced adverse consequences from colonialism. Disconnection from their land, cultural suppression, and loss of cultural identity have had adverse effects on the health outcomes and overall well-being of the Métis population. Considering the critical importance of cultural continuity as a health-protective factor for Métis people, this thesis explored Métis people's lived experiences of culture and cultural continuity and the connection with health and well-being. The present thesis used secondary data from a research project titled "Preventing Cancer Through Métis Cultural Revitalization: A Framework for Saskatchewan." Data included twenty four semi-structured interviews with Métis citizens (12 females and 12 males, average age of 47 years) regarding their health and culture. Descriptive phenomenology was used to guide the secondary analysis of the interview data. The analysis revealed that some participants discussed cultural disconnection, while others emphasized active participation in Métis culture, which resulted in the promotion of cultural aspects such as traditional practices, language, and connection to the land. These elements were essential for re-establishing identity, nurturing a deeper connection to heritage, and potentially providing health benefits, including stress relief, a sense of belonging, and pride. The findings contribute to a greater understanding of the role of culture and cultural continuity in promoting health and well-being among Métis people. The results are an addition that could guide future research endeavors with other Métis communities that aim to explore health promotion through cultural continuity.

Description

Keywords

Métis, Health Promotion

Citation

Degree

Master of Science (M.Sc.)

Department

Community Health and Epidemiology

Program

Community and Population Health Science

Citation

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