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Negotiating culturally incongruent healthcare systems : the process of accessing dementia care in northern Saskatchewan

Date

2006-12-20

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

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Publisher

ORCID

Type

Degree Level

Masters

Abstract

This study is an exploration of the process of accessing dementia care for Aboriginal Older Adults living in Northern Saskatchewan. The research question for this project was, “What is the process of accessing formal healthcare for dementia from the perspective of Northern Saskatchewan Aboriginal communities, and what factors specifically impede or encourage accessing formal care?” Grounded theory methodology informed the research process. Theoretical sampling resulted in a sample of thirty participants. Data were generated through eighteen in-person, semi-structured interviews; two in-person, semi-structured group interviews; and three focus group discussions including a directed activity led by participants. Analysis of data using the grounded theory constant comparison method led to an emergent theory that was verified by research participants.The theory that emerged explains the basic social process at the heart of the research question. The grounded theory, “The process of negotiating culturally incongruent healthcare systems” explains the access to and use of formal healthcare from the perspective of those living in Northern Saskatchewan. Specific attention to the social context of healthcare access helped to illuminate the challenges faced by Aboriginal Older Adults when accessing healthcare services. The findings indicate a need for enhancing the cultural competence of healthcare provision to Older Adults with dementia in Northern Saskatchewan while providing formal support for those persons with dementia as well as for their informal caregivers.

Description

Keywords

grounded theory, Aboriginal, access, older adult, feminist, postcolonial, healthcare, dementia

Citation

Degree

Master of Science (M.Sc.)

Department

Community Health and Epidemiology

Program

Community Health and Epidemiology

Citation

Part Of

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DOI

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