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Testing the Career Adjustment Model for Immigrant Women to Canada

Date

2012-02-10

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

ORCID

Type

Degree Level

Masters

Abstract

According to the statistical data, immigrant women are less integrated into the Canadian labour market than immigrant men or Canadian-born women, even when accounted for years of education and work experience. Studies of immigrant women’s cross-cultural adjustment and labour market integration have been largely underestimated in the history of research on immigrants’ acculturation. This study explores the factors that contribute to a successful career adjustment of immigrant women in Canada. A comprehensive model of psychological, situational, and social factors designed by Rasouli et al. (2008) and revised by the author was tested on a sample of 101 immigrant women across Canada. Career adjustment was measured positively as job satisfaction and negatively as occupational stress. Career management self-efficacy, problem-focused coping, emotion-focused coping, language self-efficacy, social support, personal income, work experience from Canada, and work experience from the country of origin predicted job satisfaction while emotion-focused coping, career management-self-efficacy, education attained in Canada, and parenthood predicted occupational stress. Career management self-efficacy and education obtained in Canada were in particularly strong predictors of those variables. Implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed.

Description

Keywords

Career adjustment, immigrant women, self-efficacy, sociocultural adjustment

Citation

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Psychology

Program

Applied Social

Citation

Part Of

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DOI

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