Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMcKenzie, Marcia
dc.contributor.advisorGarcea, Joseph
dc.creatorVizina, Yvonne Nadine 1964-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-21T14:17:53Z
dc.date.available2018-09-21T14:17:53Z
dc.date.created2018-10
dc.date.issued2018-09-21
dc.date.submittedOctober 2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/10813
dc.description.abstractThe overall purpose of this study is to begin identifying relationships between sustainability and Indigenous knowledges in post-secondary education. Sustainability discourse indicates a need to reconsider our approaches to social, economic, and environmental issues because without deep transformation, global human survival is in jeopardy. At the same time, post-secondary education institutions in Canada are Indigenizing their settings but lack discussion on sustainability and Indigenization as related concepts. For this study, interviews and surveys were conducted with faculty and administrators working in Indigenous PSE programs in ten post-secondary education institutions across Canada to gain insight into: Indigenous philosophical principles concerning the environment and sustainability; how sustainability is linked to curriculum, research, facility operations, institutional governance, and community outreach; how sustainability is practiced, and what policies drive those practices. The five key findings that emerged from the study are: 1) Indigenous worldviews are based in a belief of the sacred, which orients Indigenous knowledges and responsibilities for sustaining life on Earth; 2) Sustainability is expressed as a function of tradition linking Indigenous identity with culture, language, and environmental health; 3) Entrenching Indigenous knowledges throughout institutions is to sustain cultural identity; 4) National and international standards supporting Indigenous self-determination are primary drivers for the inclusion of Indigenous knowledges and advance the underlying principle of sustainability; and 5) Indigenous holistic learning includes social, economic, and environmental aspects of sustainability. These findings indicate that supporting Indigenous cultural identity through integration of Indigenous knowledges can expand the basis of sustainability practices and programs in post-secondary education, but there is a need to increase dialogue about the interconnectedness of sustainability and Indigenous knowledges based on a rights-based approach to Indigenous education consistent with national and international standards.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectIndigenous knowledge
dc.subjectsustainability
dc.subjecteducation
dc.subjectpost-secondary
dc.subjecthigher education
dc.subjectFirst Nation
dc.subjectMétis
dc.subjectInuit
dc.titleIndigenous Knowledges and Sustainability in Post-Secondary Education
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2018-09-21T14:17:53Z
thesis.degree.departmentSchool of Environment and Sustainability
thesis.degree.disciplineEnvironment and Sustainability
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewan
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
dc.type.materialtext
dc.contributor.committeeMemberReed, Maureen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWilson, Alexandria
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGarcea, Joseph
dc.contributor.committeeMemberStrickert, Graham
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-2999-4008


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record