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dc.contributor.advisorGutwin, Carl
dc.creatorLong, Michael 1992-
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-13T16:15:33Z
dc.date.available2019-06-13T16:15:33Z
dc.date.created2019-04
dc.date.issued2019-06-13
dc.date.submittedApril 2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/12131
dc.description.abstractVideo games are a major type of entertainment for millions of people, and feature a wide variety genres. Many genres of video games require quick reactions, and in these games it is critical for player performance and player experience that the game is responsive. One of the major contributing factors that can make games less responsive is local latency — the total delay between input and a resulting change to the screen. Local latency is produced by a combination of delays from input devices, software processing, and displays. Due to latency, game companies spend considerable time and money play-testing their games to ensure the game is both responsive and that the in-game difficulty is reasonable. Past studies have made it clear that local latency negatively affects both player performance and experience, but there is still little knowledge about local latency’s exact effects on games. In this thesis, we address this problem by providing game designers with more knowledge about local latency’s effects. First, we performed a study to examine latency’s effects on performance and experience for popular pointing input devices used with games. Our results show significant differences between devices based on the task and the amount of latency. We then provide design guidelines based on our findings. Second, we performed a study to understand latency’s effects on ‘atoms’ of interaction in games. The study varied both latency and game speed, and found game speed to affect a task’s sensitivity to latency. Third, we used our findings to build a model to help designers quickly identify latency-sensitive game atoms, thus saving time during play-testing. We built and validated a model that predicts errors rates in a game atom based on latency and game speed. Our work helps game designers by providing new insight into latency’s varied effects and by modelling and predicting those effects
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectLatency
dc.subjectgames
dc.subjectinput devices
dc.subjectlag
dc.subjectdelay
dc.subjectgaming
dc.titleEffects of Local Latency on Games
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2019-06-13T16:15:33Z
thesis.degree.departmentComputer Science
thesis.degree.disciplineComputer Science
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewan
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.Sc.)
dc.type.materialtext
dc.contributor.committeeMemberEager, Derek
dc.contributor.committeeMemberStanley, Kevin
dc.contributor.committeeMemberFarthing, Jon
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-0348-4843


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