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dc.creatorDaigle, Joanna C 1990-
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-01T19:46:42Z
dc.date.available2018-05-01T19:46:42Z
dc.date.created2018-05
dc.date.issued2018-05-01
dc.date.submittedMay 2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/8543
dc.description.abstractThis research aimed to describe temporal patterns in the number and duration of drinking water advisories in Saskatchewan communities on and off reserve from 2012 to 2016. The analyses included 445 communities – including cities, towns, villages, and reserves – in which 2036 advisories were in effect. The large sample test of proportion was used to compare the observed proportion of advisories issued which occurred on and off reserve to the expected proportion based upon the proportion of communities which experienced an advisory during the study period that were reserve or non-reserve. Comparisons were also conducted which took into account the size of non-reserve communities, the season advisories were issued, the year advisory were issued, and the community’s geographic region. Descriptive statistics were utilized to describe reasons for issuing advisories. The duration of advisories was investigated using the same comparisons, as well as the reason for issuing advisories, using the Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney U Test. Reserve drinking water systems were found to have fewer advisories than would be expected when compared to communities off reserve (p<0.01). Advisories on reserve were longer lasting than those off reserve, the median advisory lasted 14 days on reserve and 9 days for the smallest community type off reserve (villages) (p<0.01). Advisories occurred more often in summer for both reserve and non reserve communities. But while advisories were equivalent in duration across seasons off reserve, advisories issued for reserves were significantly longer if they were issued during the winter(p=<0.02). Advisories were issued more often off reserve for depressurization and equipment issues, while power outages, disinfection failures, contamination, and operation deviation were more common on reserve. The analyses included in this study highlight the acute problem of drinking water on reserve and shows that significant work remains to ensure that all Saskatchewan residents have access to safe, potable drinking water. The use of comparison between reserve and non-reserve communities represents an important step forward towards understanding the extent and causes of drinking water disparities across Saskatchewan.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectFirst Nations, Boil Water Advisories, Small Communities
dc.titleA COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF COMMUNITY WATER SYSTEMS AND DRINKING WATER ADVISORIES ACTIVE IN SASKATCHEWAN COMMUNITIES FROM 2012-2016
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2018-05-01T19:46:42Z
thesis.degree.departmentSchool of Public Health
thesis.degree.disciplinePublic Health
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewan
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Public Health (M.P.H.)
dc.type.materialtext
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHackett, Paul
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBharadwaj, Lalita
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGriebel, Philip
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWaldner, Cheryl
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBoyd, Greg


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