Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorWason-Ellam, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFindlay, Lenen_US
dc.creatorCrandall, Joanieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-21T12:01:00Z
dc.date.available2014-06-21T12:01:00Z
dc.date.created2013-03en_US
dc.date.issued2013-04-25en_US
dc.date.submittedMarch 2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-03-991en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study explores the effects of engaging with contemporary dual language texts, specifically Cree texts, as a non-Cree educator intent on using the literature classroom as a place in which to explore cross-cultural communication. It considers how the in/accessibility of meaning when reading across cultural boundaries may be read as a challenge or a bridge for non-Cree readers. An interdisciplinary approach was employed as a research methodology to explore the potential interstices and intersections of Aboriginal epistemologies, decolonizing pedagogies, literary theories, and contemporary dual language texts. In order to begin defining the manner in which one perceives the significance of the code-switching and the varied translation practices within dual language texts, a reader response theory was developed and termed construal inquiry. As a decolonizing pedagogy that employs dialogic engagement with a text, construal inquiry is undrepinned by a self-reflective approach to meaning-making that is grounded in Luis Urrieta, Jr.'s (2007) notion of figured worlds, Jerome Bruner's (1991) model of narrative inquiry, and Mikhail Bakhtin's (1981) concept of heteroglossia. The research explores a collaborative approach to meaning-making with an awareness of how forms of subjectivities can affect reading practices. Texts that range from picture books to junior novels to autobiographical fiction are examined for the forms in which code-switching, culture, and identity can shape reader response and the dialogic discourse of cross-cultural communication. The research proposes experiential and contextual influences shape reading and interpretation and seeks to engage with how subjectivities affects pedagogical perspective, which negates a singular approach to linguistic and cultural representations and their interpretation. The research suggests that the complexities of negotiating meaning cross-culturally necessitiates relationship building with community members of the culture represented in a text and that engaging with code-switching in dual language texts using construal inquiry as a decolonizing pedagogy offers an opportunity to transform one's own subjectivity.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.subjectdual languageen_US
dc.subjectdual language textsen_US
dc.subjectCreeen_US
dc.subjectnon-Cree educatoren_US
dc.subjectliteratureen_US
dc.subjectcross-cultural communicationen_US
dc.subjectinterdisciplinaryen_US
dc.subjectAboriginalen_US
dc.subjectAboriginal epistemologyen_US
dc.subjectdecolonizing pedagogyen_US
dc.subjectliterary theoryen_US
dc.subjectcode-switchingen_US
dc.subjecttranslationen_US
dc.subjectreader response theoryen_US
dc.subjectconstrual inquiryen_US
dc.subjectnarrative inquiryen_US
dc.subjectcollaborativeen_US
dc.subjectsubjectivityen_US
dc.subjectpicture booken_US
dc.subjectjunior novelen_US
dc.subjectautobiographical fictionen_US
dc.subjectpedagogyen_US
dc.titleItwestamakewin: the invitation to dialogue with writers of Cree ancestryen_US
thesis.degree.departmentInterdisciplinary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCurriculum Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberInnes, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCarr-Stewart, Sheilaen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBalzer, Geraldineen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberVargo, Lisaen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record