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dc.creatorElliott, Patriciaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-21T12:00:13Z
dc.date.available2015-04-21T12:00:13Z
dc.date.created2015-03en_US
dc.date.issued2015-04-20en_US
dc.date.submittedMarch 2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2015-03-2010en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines nonprofit, co-operative, and volunteer media enterprises operating outside Saskatchewan’s state and commercial media sectors. Drawing on historical research and contemporary case studies, I take the position that this third sector of media activity has played, and continues to play, a much-needed role in engaging marginalized voices in social discourse, encouraging participation in community-building and local governance, fostering local-global connectedness, and holding power to account when the rights and interests of citizens are jeopardized. The cases studied reveal a surprising level of resiliency among third sector media enterprises; however, the research also finds that the challenges facing third sector media practitioners have deepened considerably in recent decades, testing this resiliency. A rapid withdrawal of media development support from the public sphere has left Saskatchewan’s third sector media at a crossroads. The degree of the problem is largely unknown outside media practitioner circles, even among civil society allies. I argue this relates to the lack of recognition of nonprofit, co-operative, and volunteer media as a distinct third sector, thus obscuring the global impact when hundreds of small undertakings shed staff and reduce operations in multiple locations across Canada. At the same time, there is increasing recognition that such media have the potential to fill a void left by commercial and state media organizations that have retreated from local communities. Accordingly, this dissertation makes the case for a coordinated media development strategy as a component of the social economy. The challenge is to build useful mechanisms of support among civil society allies that do not replicate oppressive donor-client relationships that are all too common in the arena of governmental and private sector support. While never simple, the opportunities and social benefits are considerable when citizens devise the means to participate in the creation of a robust, diverse media ecology.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.subjectSaskatchewanen_US
dc.subjectalternative mediaen_US
dc.subjectthird sectoren_US
dc.subjectthird sector mediaen_US
dc.subjectmedia developmenten_US
dc.subjectsocial economyen_US
dc.subjectsocial enterpriseen_US
dc.subjectco-operativismen_US
dc.subjectcommunity broadcastingen_US
dc.subjectmedia policyen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous mediaen_US
dc.subjectcommunity mediaen_US
dc.subjectCRTCen_US
dc.subjectCanadaen_US
dc.subjectCanada Periodical Funden_US
dc.subjectmagazine publishingen_US
dc.subjectcommunity radioen_US
dc.subjectindependent mediaen_US
dc.subjectlocal governanceen_US
dc.titleIndependent Voices: Third Sector Media Development and Local Governance in Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.departmentInterdisciplinary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInterdisciplinary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberFindlay, Isobel M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHammond-Ketilson, Louen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHanson, Cindyen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGertler, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMcMullen, Linda M.en_US


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