Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMahajarine, Nazenen_US
dc.creatorHay, Karen Janeten_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-24T11:15:05Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:40:31Z
dc.date.available2009-08-08T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:40:31Z
dc.date.created2002en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.date.submitted2002en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-06242008-111505en_US
dc.description.abstractAdverse childhood experiences-including parental and familial factors such as parental substance abuse, parental mental health problems, parental incarceration, parental unemployment and family violence, and personal factors such as physical, sexual, and emotional abuse- have been shown to strongly affect health risk behaviours in adulthood in the general population and are thus important in the health status of an individual. However, studies of people who use injection drugs have generally focused on disease seroprevalence and risk behaviours without considering their psychosocial histories. In the 2000 Regina Seroprevalence and Risk Behaviours Study, 255 people who use injection drugs completed a standardized, confidential, and anonymous interview which included questions on adverse childhood experiences and injection-related and sexual risk behaviours. Associations among and between participants' reported adverse childhood experiences and subsequent risk behaviours were tested. Demographic factors were also considered, and general linear models of factors associated with risk behaviours were developed. The rates of adverse childhood experiences and risk behaviours reported were very high. Several of the adverse childhood experiences studied were related to increased risk behaviours. The factors associated with injection-related risk behaviours were similar to those associated with sexual risk behaviours. The impact of adverse childhood experiences on risk behaviours was found to be cumulative; the more adverse childhood experiences the participants reported, the more risk behaviours they also reported. This information provides a unique opportunity to address these problems in the treatment and prevention of injection drug use. Supplementary research is needed to further elucidate the factors associated with high-risk behaviours in people who use injection drugs.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectpsychosocial historyen_US
dc.subjectintergenerational transmission of risken_US
dc.subjectparental violenceen_US
dc.subjectabuseen_US
dc.subjectHIV risken_US
dc.titleAdverse childhood experiences and risk behaviours in people who use injection drugsen_US
thesis.degree.departmentCommunity Health and Epidemiologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunity Health and Epidemiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.Sc.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberTan, Leonarden_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLeis, Anneen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record