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dc.creatorFerguson, Darryl L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-08-01T13:16:20Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:49:33Z
dc.date.available2007-09-14T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:49:33Z
dc.date.created1993-09en_US
dc.date.issued1993-09-14en_US
dc.date.submittedSeptember 1993en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-08012007-131620en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to describe the role of the C.E.O. (Education Coordinator) in Band Controlled Schools on selected Indian reserves in Saskatchewan. A number of key functions and leadership components were identified from the literature and were formulated into a structural framework. In this framework, the C.E.O. position was explored and studied under three major components: role, autonomy, and contextual conditions. The aspects of role which were examined were the identifying of the C.E.O., role expectations, role tasks, and obstacles. The functions related to autonomy were identified as performance, overlaps, perceptions, and organizations. Job satisfaction, personal qualities and attributes, and politics were related to contextual conditions. The population was five administrative teams working on Indian reserves in Northern Saskatchewan. These teams consisted of a Chief Executive Officer, the Principal, and, where applicable, the Administrative Assistant. The schools were selected because two have been Band operated for five years or more, whereas the other three were Band operated for less than two years when this study began. A case study approach was used. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with the C.E.O.s, Principals, and Administrative Assistants. An interview guide containing 18 questions designed for the Education Coordinator, and 18 questions designed specifically for Principals was used. It was concluded that broad, general similarities existed from Band to Band. However, the role was influenced by the needs, wants, and thrusts of the individual Bands. The personality, background, and interests of the individual C.E.O. had an impact upon how the role was enacted. It was difficult to isolate and compartmentalize the job of the C.E.O. on an Indian reserve. Although this study was limited in scope, a number of conclusions were reached and some implications were discussed. The C.E.O. position is a relatively new one and is in many ways unique. It would be of benefit for administrators to learn more about this position since nearly every on-reserve school in Saskatchewan is controlled by the Band. The C.E.O. position will grow and develop and have a great impact upon the future of Indian Education.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectEducational administration - Indian Bandsen_US
dc.subjectIndian Reservations - Saskatchewan - Educationen_US
dc.subjectEducation Coordinators - Aboriginal studentsen_US
dc.subjectNative schools - Administrationen_US
dc.subjectIndigneous peoples - Education - Canadaen_US
dc.titleThe role of the C.E.O. (education coordinator) in band controlled schools on selected indian reserves in Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Education (M.Ed.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberScharf, Murray P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGuy, Allanen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDevrome, Roberten_US


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