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dc.contributor.advisorHandy, Jimen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMacKinnon, Janiceen_US
dc.creatorZorbas, Jason Gregoryen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-03T17:55:49Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:50:21Z
dc.date.available2010-08-06T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:50:21Z
dc.date.created2009en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.submitted2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-08032009-175549en_US
dc.description.abstractJohn Diefenbaker’s Latin American policy was based on his vision of Canada’s national interest, which placed a strong emphasis on the achievement of greater autonomy in foreign policy for Canada vis-à-vis the US and the expansion of Canadian exports to the region. For Diefenbaker, an enhanced relationship with Latin America had the potential to lessen Canada’s dependency on the US, while giving Latin American countries an outlet for their trade, commercial and financial relations other than the US. This new approach implied that Canada would formulate and implement policy that focused more on Canadian political interests and goals. It was not a matter of charting a totally independent policy for Canada in Latin America –– true policy independence was impossible to achieve. Nor was it the case that Canada would necessarily set itself in opposition to the US when it disagreed with its policies. For Diefenbaker the goal was to pursue a foreign policy that was aligned with, but not subservient to, the US. Ultimately, Diefenbaker’s policies towards countries such as Cuba, Mexico, the Federation of the West Indies, Argentina and Brazil were somewhat successful in expanding Canadian trade and commercial activity beyond the United States, and in establishing a stronger political relationship between Canada and the Latin American region. The policies were remarkably consistent, reflecting Diefenbaker’s desire to increase Canada’s autonomy, and differentiated by his personal involvement in initiating policy at the Cabinet level and in building and cultivating relationships with Latin American leaders; the goal was to further Canadian economic and political interests in the region. Though there were possibilities for greater expansion and connections with Latin America that were missed, Diefenbaker’s Latin American policy would be built upon and continued by successive Liberal and Conservative governments once he left office.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectDiefenbakeren_US
dc.subjectCanadian diplomatic historyen_US
dc.titleDiefenbaker, Latin America and Caribbean: The Pursuit of Canadian Autonomyen_US
thesis.degree.departmentHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWaiser, Billen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKyba, Patricken_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSmith-Norris, Marthaen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberStory, Donen_US


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