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dc.contributor.advisorSpink, Kevin S.en_US
dc.creatorWatson, Jocelyn Dawnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2004-12-15T20:15:24Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T05:10:36Z
dc.date.available2004-12-16T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T05:10:36Z
dc.date.created2004-12en_US
dc.date.issued2004-12-14en_US
dc.date.submittedDecember 2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-12152004-201524en_US
dc.description.abstractSocial support has been recognized to impact positive health behaviours, including exercise participation. In the exercise domain, one conceptual framework that has been employed to examine social support is Weiss’s (1974) Model of Social Provisions. The main purpose of the present study was to utilize Weiss’s (1974) model to examine how the social provisions relate to university students’ energy expenditure while exercising with others. Specifically, this study was concerned with participants’ perceptions about the availability of social provisions, their preferences for the provisions in the exercise setting, and the congruence between social provision perceptions and preferences as they related to energy expenditure. Participants who had performed exercise with others in the past 4 weeks (N=201) completed the Modifiable Activity Questionnaire (MAQ; Kriska et al., 1990) to assess energy expenditure, as well as modified versions of the Social Provisions Scale (Cutrona & Russell, 1987) to assess social provision perceptions and preferences. Results from exploratory factor analyses revealed separate five-factor models for both the perceived provisions (i.e., attachment, reliable alliance, social integration, opportunity for nurturance, and reassurance of worth) and the preferred provisions (i.e., guidance, social integration, reliable alliance, reassurance of worth, and opportunity for nurturance). Discriminant function analyses were used to assess the unique contribution of these perceived and preferred provisions to participants’ energy expenditure. The results from the analyses indicated that none of the perceived provisions and none of the preferred provisions predicted high versus low expenditure, nor did the congruence relationship between the perceived and preferred variants of each provision predict high versus low energy expenditure. Potential explanations for the non-significant findings were highlighted with respect to study methodology. Directions for future research were also discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectsocial provisionsen_US
dc.subjectyoung adultsen_US
dc.subjectenergy expenditureen_US
dc.subjectexerciseen_US
dc.subjectsocial supporten_US
dc.titleSocial provisions in the exercise settingen_US
thesis.degree.departmentCollege of Kinesiologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Kinesiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.Sc.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKowalski, Kenten_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGraham, Tomen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGoodwin, Donnaen_US


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